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Sanitary Tortilla Factory
401-403 2nd St SW
Albuquerque, NM 87102

(505) 228-3749
stfsubmissions@gmail.com

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ACROSS THE ROOM FROM EACH OTHER hazel batrezchavez + mk

 

MK, “The Inside of the Casket”.

Across The Room From Each Other, a collaborative performance and exhibition with hazel batrezchavez and mk acting within a collective space interweaving ongoing conversations of family and practices of personal and public memorial over the duration of 6 weeks. Please check back for dates for performances, exhibitions openings for each phase. 

 

PHASE ONE (October 2 – 23), hazel batrezchavez considers the layers of systematic oppression related to silencing and policing of individuals both at the border and on the stolen land we currently occupy. BLINDFOLDED UNDER THE SAME SUN moves freely between poetry, textiles, sound-video installation, and large-scale sculpture. It is grounded in batrezchavez’s familial history of migration from El Salvador/ Mexico and the inter-generational experiences they have shared when it comes to resistance, isolation, and survival.  

BANNER on north side of STF is a temporary installment affiliated with the work of hazel batrezchavez. The artist is a participant of a coalition of artists, fronteristxs. As part of the movement for abolition and to divest public pension funds from private prisons, fronteristxs will install a wall-size message in downtown Albuquerque on Oct 2nd at 10AM. Watch live on Instagram and Facebook: @fronteristxs

https://fronteristxs.site

Follow #NMERBdivest, a project of the Prison Divest New Mexico Coalition

 

PHASE TWO (October 26 – November 6), hazel batrezchavez and mk perform their collaborative piece Across The Room From Each Other, over the duration of four days, they will acknowledge their own perspective journeys, and collective memories regarding familial histories. 

PHASE THREE (November 9 – 28), mk investigates coping mechanisms through the function of photographic memory within the last remaining family archives in their immediate family. You’ll miss me when I’m gone, calls attention to their uprooted deep southern upbringing in relation to the practices of memorial, forgiveness and celebration while addressing their personal and public relationships with family

hazel batrezchavez and MK received Sanitary Tortilla Factory’s Exceptional Visual Artist Scholar Award in 2020. The Exceptional Visual Artist Scholar (EVAS) series offers professional space for two Master of Fine Art graduate students per year as their final thesis show. The culminating exhibition launches them into their profession as an artist. With the series, we underscore exceptional artists attending regional institutions while highlighting Albuquerque’s innovative contemporary art scene.


hazel batrezchavez received her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Studio Art and Anthropology from Grinnell College in 2017 and her MFA in Sculpture at the University of New Mexico in 2020. Since then she has been a part of various group exhibitions and pop-up shows in the United States, specifically in California, New Mexico, Iowa, and most recently México City, and Michoacán, México. batrezchavez is a recipient of the Center of Fine Arts, Dean’s Travel Grant Award, MaryAnn Evans Grant and of both the Lucile Lattanner Reid Brock and the Betty Sabo Scholarship. At the moment batrezchavez is partnering with the Santa Fe Dreamers Project as part of her StoryMaps Fellowship at the Santa Fe Arts Institute (SFAI) to create a collaborative project, that centers the voices of humans that have been forced to migrate from their homelands. As she continues to prepare for a performance at the border ports of entry in El Paso and Brownsville, Texas following her own families migration.

 

MK (Monica Kennedy) is an artist living in Albuquerque, New Mexico. In 2017, they received their BFA in Photography and Digital Media from the University of Houston and are currently attending the University of New Mexico for their MFA in Photography. They are originally from a small rural town by the name of Sulligent, Alabama, and this place has become a driving force for the mass majority of their work.

Using found items, stories, and the longing to be back with their family in this small town. They work in a variety of mediums ranging from photography, printmaking and sculpture in order to pursue and question their upbringing, identity, family, and the terms of loss and memory. They have shown at institutions such as the Blaffer Art Museum, The National Hispanic Cultural Center and SITE Santa Fe.

POLYCEPHALY

View Exhibition

AUGUST 7 – 28

ALICIA LISA BROWN, WILL GABALDON, LUCIA LOVE, BABETTE RITTENBERG, RHIAN PRITCHARD, SARAH SARCHIN

Sanitary Tortilla Factory is excited to present Polycephaly, a group show of painters and multimedia artists that features human heads in some form. From traditional portraits, to the wild, raucous distortions of surreal cartoon figures- Polycephaly, is the condition in which a creature, human or animal, has multiple heads. The work in the exhibition shares a superficial theme of figuration, while simultaneously being deeply divergent in thought and approach. In conjunction with the show, there will be a scheduled series of online artist conversations that aims to facilitate inter art community dialogue.  All of the presented artists are based in cities around the country and will discuss their work with a local Albuquerque based artist. The video talks will explore various themes, subject matter, and processes, as well as observations on the impact of the current historical climate on their local arts communities.  Albuquerque video participants include: Frank Blazquez, Jodie Herrera, Jessamyn Lovell, Earl McBride, Helen Atkins and Nancy Zastudil. Polycephaly is curated by Hannah Bluhm.

Artist Talks Release Schedule:

8/07/20 “Polycephaly: Jessamyn Lovell & Alicia Lisa Brown”  

8/13/20 “Polycephaly:  Will Gabaldon & Helen Atkins”

8/14/20 “Polycephaly:  Lucia Love & Earl McBride”

8/20/20 “Polycephaly:  Frank Blazquez & Babette Rittenberg” 

8/21/20 “Polycephaly: Jodie Herrera & Rhian Pritchard” 

8/27/20 “Polycephaly: Sarah Sarchin & Nancy Zastudil”

Family Resemblance

Family Resemblance
Sallie Scheufler

March 6 – March 27, 2020
First Friday: March 6, 6-8 pm
Closing Reception: March 27, 6-8 pm 

In Family Resemblance, Sallie Scheufler presents text, videos and photographs of herself and the women in her family. Taking a critical look at her personal history, Scheufler uses time-based media to explore how relationships within her family affect her sense of self, performed and inherited. Staged portraits utilize tools found in the beauty industry to draw attention to physical features, alike and unlike. She dresses in drag to become her older sister. She and her mom get matching hairdos. Her little sister applies her make-up as she does to herself. Text throughout the exhibition recounts stories of superficial desires and the ways that the women in her family perform gender. Family Resemblance addresses beauty standards, wanting what we don’t have, and growing up in makeover culture.

Sallie Scheufler is an interdisciplinary artist currently living in Albuquerque, NM. Scheufler uses her personal history as artistic fodder, in context of feminist theory and familial relationships through performative video and sound installations, live participatory performance, photography, and sculptural installation. Scheufler has exhibited work in museums and galleries nationally including the Center for Contemporary Art, Northlight Gallery, 516 ARTS, and the University of New Mexico Art Museum. Scheufler has been awarded a Beaumont Newhall Fellowship and a Robert Heinecken scholarship, among others. She received her MFA in studio art from the University of New Mexico and her BFA from Arizona State University. When she is not in the studio, Scheufler works as part-time faculty in photography at the University of New Mexico and is the Assistant Director at Richard Levy Gallery.

Image Caption: Sallie Scheufler, Mom and Me, 2020, Inkjet print, 24 x 30 inches

A SOFT EYE, A MIRROR-EYE

A SOFT EYE, A MIRROR-EYE
Cedra Wood
 
January 24 – February 28, 2020
Opening Reception: February 7, 6-8 pm
 
In A Soft Eye, A Mirror-Eye, Cedra Wood presents to-scale drawings of two species: the camel and the turkey vulture. Drawn to both of these groups because of their hardihood, resilience, and elegance, Wood creates intimate portraits, attempting to depict each animal in a way that defies both description and stereotype.
 
In one of the two series, Wood showcases the individuality of nine camels she worked with on a ranch in Texas, affectionately presenting the animals’ disparate personalities and physiognomies. The work stands as a testament to the distinctive character of each of these “ships of the desert.” The second body of drawings comprises five portraits of a single turkey vulture, a resident of the New Mexico Wildlife Center. Humans often react to vultures either with revulsion, fear, or superstition, which Wood hopes to counterpoint by presenting Sol’s physical features precisely and reverently, letting his remarkable qualities speak for themselves.
 
Banner Image: Portrait of SOL 1, 20″x26″, graphite on paper, 2019

Fish in Persian Gardens

Fish in Persian Gardens
Extracts of Poetry and Literature as Revolt

Illustrations by Zahra Marwan

December 6, 2019 – December 25, 2019

OPENING RECEPTION: December 6, from 6 – 8 pm
With Performances at 7 by Cory McBride, Amir Raeisi, and Al Shammari.

 

Arabs have complacently considered themselves to be a people of poets, indeed, the people of poets. Poetry was the record of their lofty deeds, their claim to glory, their secret garden, their diwan.

 

Abdelfattah Kilito – Arabs and the Art of Storytelling

 

Sometimes when listening to a modern song from the Middle East, it turns out to be a 7th-century poem. There is a long tradition and pride in literature and poetry amongst the Arabs, Persians, Bedouins, Andalusians and cultural groups in between and through their expansions. Often attracting mass audiences from rural villages to sophisticated capital cities. Even in modern times, they continue to have an impact on popular culture. Where visuals come to life from language and text. It is a longstanding platform for people to openly critique or lament, to feel pride. There is also despotism and nationalism in the use of this tradition.

 

These illustrative works of poems are a reflection of the subversive ways in which people express their grief, nostalgia, love, and breaks in community s. Perhaps not explicitly for revolt, but irregularities and abstractions of it. The content of these illustrations stems directly from the language expressed. Whether they were exiled, killed, or appreciated for being headstrong, these pieces are also reflections of the fatigue associated with their fight.