Creating Platforms for Community + Artists

Join Our Mailing List


Sanitary Tortilla Factory
401-403 2nd St SW
Albuquerque, NM 87102

(505) 228-3749
stfsubmissions@gmail.com

Artist in Residence 2020 Announcement

Posted in A.I.R.

We are excited to announce Mitchell Squire will be STF’s Artist in residence this summer. Mitchell Squire is a multidisciplinary artist and educator. His practice encompasses architecture, visual art, and the study of material culture. He is best known for his elegiac assemblages and his examinations of the afterimage recorded onto the backs of spent law enforcement firearms training targets. He has mounted solo exhibitions at CUE Art Foundation (New York), White Cube (London), Des Moines Art Center, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art (Omaha), and various university galleries.

His work appears in the permanent collections of the Des Moines Art Center and the Minneapolis Institute of Art and notable corporate and private collections. He has completed residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Ox-Bow School of Art and Artists’ Residency, Banff Centre for Arts and Creativity, and Cannonball (Miami), and was an invited participant in educational programs at MoMA, The New Museum, Pérez Art Museum, and La Biennale Architettura di Venezia (2014). While in residence, Mitchell’s work will be focused on “the autotelic body”, “an ongoing series of self-portraits, drawings, and paintings which explore the socio-sexual effects of extractive economies and the material geophysics of race.” Squire will be using the residency “as a base to research the American southwest desert in relation to the Black body and race.” Special thanks to our esteemed jurors: Candice Hopkins + Raven Chacon.

https://mitchellsquire.com

A SOFT EYE, A MIRROR-EYE

A SOFT EYE, A MIRROR-EYE
Cedra Wood
 
January 24 – February 28, 2020
Opening Reception: February 7, 6-8 pm
 
In A Soft Eye, A Mirror-Eye, Cedra Wood presents to-scale drawings of two species: the camel and the turkey vulture. Drawn to both of these groups because of their hardihood, resilience, and elegance, Wood creates intimate portraits, attempting to depict each animal in a way that defies both description and stereotype.
 
In one of the two series, Wood showcases the individuality of nine camels she worked with on a ranch in Texas, affectionately presenting the animals’ disparate personalities and physiognomies. The work stands as a testament to the distinctive character of each of these “ships of the desert.” The second body of drawings comprises five portraits of a single turkey vulture, a resident of the New Mexico Wildlife Center. Humans often react to vultures either with revulsion, fear, or superstition, which Wood hopes to counterpoint by presenting Sol’s physical features precisely and reverently, letting his remarkable qualities speak for themselves.
 
Banner Image: Portrait of SOL 1, 20″x26″, graphite on paper, 2019

Artists in Residence Application Due!

Posted in Uncategorized

The Sanitary Tortilla will be hosting an artist in residence for a six-week project during the summer of 2020.

The artist will be provided housing, studio space, access to the fabrication shop, travel funds ($500), and a stipend ($1800) for the residency. The studio space is STF’s 1100sf exhibition space. STF’s fabrication workspace contains a basic woodworking shop (table saw, band saw, miter saw, sanders), hand-held power tools, and a light metal shop including a TIG welder, chop saw, and grinders (this is a studio-wide used space). FUSE a maker space is less than a half-mile. FUSE has most any tool needed- screen printing, large format printers, full metal/wood shops, 3D printers (basic knowledge is assessed via a nominal fee class).

Apply: http://sanitarytortillafactory.org/submissions/

Curatorial Team

Candice Hopkins is a writer, a curator and a citizen of Carcross/Tagish First Nation. Her practice explores the intersections of history, contemporary art and indigeneity. Hopkins is senior curator for the 2019 and 2021 editions of the Toronto Biennial of Art and was a part of the curatorial team of the Canadian Pavilion of the 58th Venice Biennale in 2019, featuring the work of the media art collective Isuma. She is co-curator of notable exhibitions including Art For a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now; the 2018 SITE Santa Fe biennial, Casa Tomada; documenta 14 in Athens, Greece and Kassel, Germany; Sakahàn: International Indigenous Art; Close Encounters: The Next 500 Years; and the 2014 SITElines biennial, Unsettled Landscapes. Her writing is published widely and recent essays and presentations include “The Gilded Gaze: Wealth and Economies on the Colonial Frontier,” for the documenta 14 Reader, “Outlawed Social Life” for South as a State of Mind and Sounding the Margins: A Choir of Minor Voices at Small Projects, Tromsø, Norway. She has lectured internationally including at the Witte de With, Tate Modern, Dak’Art Biennale, Artists Space, Tate Britain, Yale University, Cornell University, and the University of British Columbia.

 

 

Raven Chacon is a composer, performer and installation artist from Fort Defiance, Navajo Nation. As a solo artist, collaborator, or with Postcommodity, Chacon has exhibited or performed at Whitney Biennial, documenta 14, REDCAT, Musée d’art Contemporain de Montréal, San Francisco Electronic Music Festival, Chaco Canyon, Ende Tymes Festival, 18th Biennale of Sydney, and The Kennedy Center. Every year, he teaches 20 students to write string quartets for the Native American Composer Apprenticeship Project (NACAP). He is the recipient of the United States Artists fellowship in Music, The Creative Capital award in Visual Arts, The Native Arts and Cultures Foundation artist fellowship, and the American Academy’s Berlin Prize for Music Composition. He lives in Albuquerque, NM

Fish in Persian Gardens

Fish in Persian Gardens
Extracts of Poetry and Literature as Revolt

Illustrations by Zahra Marwan

December 6, 2019 – December 25, 2019

OPENING RECEPTION: December 6, from 6 – 8 pm
With Performances at 7 by Cory McBride, Amir Raeisi, and Al Shammari.

 

Arabs have complacently considered themselves to be a people of poets, indeed, the people of poets. Poetry was the record of their lofty deeds, their claim to glory, their secret garden, their diwan.

 

Abdelfattah Kilito – Arabs and the Art of Storytelling

 

Sometimes when listening to a modern song from the Middle East, it turns out to be a 7th-century poem. There is a long tradition and pride in literature and poetry amongst the Arabs, Persians, Bedouins, Andalusians and cultural groups in between and through their expansions. Often attracting mass audiences from rural villages to sophisticated capital cities. Even in modern times, they continue to have an impact on popular culture. Where visuals come to life from language and text. It is a longstanding platform for people to openly critique or lament, to feel pride. There is also despotism and nationalism in the use of this tradition.

 

These illustrative works of poems are a reflection of the subversive ways in which people express their grief, nostalgia, love, and breaks in community s. Perhaps not explicitly for revolt, but irregularities and abstractions of it. The content of these illustrations stems directly from the language expressed. Whether they were exiled, killed, or appreciated for being headstrong, these pieces are also reflections of the fatigue associated with their fight.

2020 Exhibitions Announcement

2020 Exhibitions Announcement

Posted in Uncategorized

Congratulations 

Toni Gentili 
Michelle Murphy
SV Randall
Tamara Zibners

Polycephaly
Curated by Hannah Bluhm
feat. Babette Rittenberg, Jas Knight, Lucia Love, Will Galbadon, 

We are Longing
feat. Kaitlin Bryson, Eric-Paul Riege, Madeline Cass, Matea Friend

Women of Color
Curated by Jodi Herrera