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Sanitary Tortilla Factory
401-403 2nd St SW
Albuquerque, NM 87102

(505) 228-3749
stfsubmissions@gmail.com

Flight (02) Reconciliation

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Flight (02) Reconciliation Conversations on Empathy

SATURDAY & SUNDAYS – June 23/4 + June 30/July 10am- 6pm

THESE ARE DROP IN HOURS (Come by any time during these hours)

Additional days/times are welcomed by appointment 401 2nd SW @ the Sanitary Tortilla Factory

This is an open invitation for the public to attend a workshop where artist sheri crider will talk about the inspiration for the upcoming exhibition Flight. The casual event is intended to be an opportunity to discuss and exchange stories and strategies for and about empathy. Participants will have the opportunity to construct one or more birds that will take flight in the exhibition. Everyone will receive a bird from the exhibition or a limited release Reconciliation t-shirt at the exhibition in exchange for their participation. There will also be more information on the necessity for immigration reform and the current systems relationship to mass incarceration. The exhibition opens August 24th at the UNM Art Museum.

Flight (02) is the second of three events partially sponsored by the Right of Return Fellowship which invests in formerly incarcerated artists to create original works to further criminal justice reform in partnership with advocates and organizers. Sheri Crider is one of the inaugural recipients of this fellowship.

Proceeds benefit local organizations that support community members impacted by these issues including the NM Dream Team, New Mexico Immigrant Law Center & the Santa Fe Dreamers Project.

Sheri Crider is a visual artist, a community builder, a civil rights dreamer, living and working in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The seemingly innate ability to draw and create was the key to recovering from many years of drug addicted, homelessness and incarceration. sheri has a BFA from the University of Arizona, a MFA from the University of New Mexico and is the creative force behind the Sanitary Tortilla Factory.

FOR MORE INFO: CONTACT SHERI CRIDER @ sherilcrider@gmail.com or call 505.228.3749

<b><i>Beautiful Test Sites / Now I am become death</i></b>

Beautiful Test Sites / Now I am become death

Beautiful Test Sites / Now I am become death

July 13 – August 31, 2018

Opening Reception: Friday, July 13, 2018, 6 – 9 pm

In Beautiful Test Sites / Now I am become death, Mitchell Squire and Nora Wendl make full use of their research-based and architecturally-founded practices to present a series of photographs that meditate upon “beautiful test sites”: spaces and bodies wastelanded by the American techno-utopian imagination of the 20th century. For Squire, this means unearthing a series of inherited mid-20th century photographs taken by an amateur photographer—who at the time served as Executive Secretary of the Iowa Industrial and Defense Commission (1941-45), the first Director of the Iowa Development Commission (1945-53), and State Director of Civil Defense during WWII and again in the 1950s—and whose subjects were both women and nuclear blasts, whose images Squire alters through the strategic use of gilded frames, veils, and glass vases. Nora Wendl presents a series of photographs taken during her recent occupational performance of the all-glass Farnsworth House, designed by Mies van der Rohe for Dr. Edith Farnsworth in the mid-20th century—a house that was conceived the same year as the first American nuclear test. Wendl pairs these with a series of archival photographs of women within this house who have commonly been mistaken as being Dr. Farnsworth, which she heavily annotates with autobiographical and biographical information, thus bringing specificity to women who are otherwise anonymous within the visual discourse of architectural history: researcher and subject alike.

Above Image: Mitchell Squire, Untitled, 2018, dimensions variable, photographs and packing tape.

The mode of operation in viewing visual information today, and particularly photographs, is that even a casual observer must work as a journalist to determine veracity. At the same time, the photograph is a way to arrest beauty, to prolong it, and to catalog even those places and bodies that are wastelanded until a future time when they can be read and named.

Mitchell Squire: Mitchell Squire is an artist and educator whose practice encompasses architecture, visual art, and the study of material culture. His work employs techniques of assemblage and informational strategies of collection and archival presentation, toward understanding the sociopolitical complexity of material and immaterial artifacts. He holds the position of Professor of Architecture at Iowa State University.

Nora Wendl: Nora Wendl is a writer, artist and educator who uses disciplinary strategies drawn equally from literature, visual art, and architecture to amplify overlooked or suppressed narratives within the built and unbuilt environment. She holds the position of Associate Professor of Architecture at the University of New Mexico.

Notes on Gentrification

two years ago(2016)….. A year before we moved to 2nd & Lead I had started reading about the relationship between artists and gentrification. I had spent the past 8 years  on my hands and knees setting tile in local Mcmansions to dump any and all income into creating a sustainable art space. Shortly after moving into the space a neighbor business owner said, “Let’s make this the next Wynwood.” I didn’t mention I had just returned from Miami a few weeks ago and had stumbled among the remnants of an industrial, working class neighborhood turned art party- Wynwood. I can’t ever seem to shake my nostalgia around work-  people made things, they made a living, built a business. Developers want us to believe in transformation. 

in progress …(summer 2017) on our street, twice a day- a steady stream of people travel to and from the Albuquerque Rescue Mission for food and additional resources. In my mind, it is a welcome reminder of the deep disparities thickening in our communities. Occasionally, it’s a little more than just passing by, I get to know their name.  For women living on the street finding a safe place is a huge challenge.  It was the beginning of June, a young woman we will call “D” started using our bathroom about twice a day. A few, short days later another artist was completely alarmed by D’s presence in the building. It always surprises me when progressive activists engaged in #metoo, #blacklivesmatter readily assign threatening stereotypes to people. Reflexively, D was labeled as a threat. It was the summer we hosted our first social practice visiting artist. Christine Wong Yap’s project, Belonging was an outsider’s foray into one’s sense of belonging in a community. “The goal of Belonging is to reveal the pivotal experiences that shape one’s sense of belonging and connectedness to a place and country, and how it ultimately defines our authentic selves; and to say, We All Belong Here. http://christinewongyap.com/work/2017/belonging/index.html the experience made for great conversations  …….

Still Moving

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Details of Hazel harvest by Kacie Erin Smith, 2018 and Paper Roots II by Emma Difani, 2017

Still Moving

By Emma Difani and Kacie Erin Smith

May 18 – June 22, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION: Friday, May 18, 6-9pm

Sanitary Tortilla Factory is pleased to present Still Moving. In Still Moving Emma Difani and Kacie Erin Smith create print and sculptural works which respond to how people relate to land — the urban wild and cultivated landscape, respectively. Difani drafts maps for discovering alternative definitions of nature in the city that embrace the grown and the constructed alike, charting sincere connections to place. Smith offers a personal take on notions of utility, tradition and belonging based on her study of transhumance while on residency in Spain. With this work, the artists are still learning through endless observation, still moving through continual exploration.

Gently Radical Changing

Joining in Acknowledgement (detail), Reishi mushroom, weaving, 13″ x 6″ x 15″

 

April 27 – May 11, 2018

OPENING RECEPTION: Friday, April 27 6-9pm

Poetry reading by Beata Tsosie-Peña 7:00pm

CLOSING RECEPTION: May 11, 2018 – 6:00-9:00pm

In Gently Radical Changing, Kaitlin Bryson engages with the legacy of toxic contamination and subsequent trauma in ecologies ridden with histories of environmental injustices. The work presented in the exhibition offers gestures of remediation and healing to these places, through bioremediative sculpture and performance, video, installation, and participatory workshops. In partnership with the Environmental Justice department of Tewa Women’s United, based out of Española, New Mexico, this work synergistically explores how radical environmental and social change can happen through compassionate acts of interspecies collaboration. 

The work presented in the exhibition will transform and physically change throughout the duration of the show. Some works will appear and others will disappear. Viewers are encouraged to stop by throughout the exhibition run to observe the living works.

Exceptional Visual Artist Scholar Series

Gently Radical Changing, new works by Kaitlin Bryson is one of two exhibitions in 2018 that is part of Sanitary Tortilla Factory’s Exceptional Visual Artist Scholar Series. The Exceptional Visual Artist Scholar Series offers professional space for the culminating exhibition that defines the student’s launch into their profession as an artist. The series hopes to underscore exceptional artists attending regional institutions while highlighting Albuquerque’s historic connection to contemporary art practice.

About the Artist

Kaitlin Bryson lives and works in the high deserts of New Mexico, and has spent her life working as an artist and organic farmer. Drawing from her experience as a cultivator, her artwork illuminates the processual nature of life through the lens of transformation. Biological materials are embedded into her work so that the “finished” pieces have the potential to play, transform, and live out their own dynamic processes. Her work unfolds as restorative gestures for human and nonhuman audiences, serving as a reminder that mutability and adaptability are the common grounds we all inhabit.

Bryson received a Bachelor of Fine Arts from The University of Nevada, Reno in 2012, and is pursuing a Master of Fine Arts in Art & Ecology from the University of New Mexico. Her work has been included in group exhibitions at The Holland Project in Reno, Nevada, Site Santa Fe, and BioCultura in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and has been performed at The Holocene in Portland, Oregon. In January of 2018 Bryson will participate in the Interface Residency Programme in Gallway, Ireland, supported by funding in part from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation, and the Lannan Foundation.

http://www.kaitlinbryson.com/